Tomato Fondue.

One of the greatest things I learned in culinary school was the basic tomato fondue.

Although it would be DIVINE—it is not a cheese sauce with chopped up tomatoes. No, it’s simply tomatoes, garlic, and shallot cooked down with thyme and a splash of white wine, thus making it an excellent accompaniment to many dishes.

Like risotto on a cold winter’s night when preparing for a long run. Which I did. And then topped it with cheese.

HUZZAHHH!

Tomato Fondue

Ingredients
4-5 tomatoes on the vine
2 cloves of garlic
1 sprig of thyme
1 medium shallot, minced
Salt & pepper
Extra-virgin olive oil
Sugar, if necessary
¼ cup white wine

IMG_3848

Procedure
1. Prepare tomatoes: Heat saucepan filled with water over high heat. Core and score the tomatoes. When water comes to a boil, drop the tomatoes for 4-5 minutes, until skin has loosened. Remove; shock in ice water to stop the cooking process. Peel skin off of tomatoes; discard. Slice tomatoes in half, squeeze juice out into sink or garbage to remove seeds; chop halves.
2. In a sauté pan over medium heat, add shallot and garlic and sweat for 5 minutes. Add tomatoes, wine, salt, and thyme*. Cover and cook down over low heat until tomato mix has consistency of jam.
3. Remove thyme stems, season to taste, reserve for desired use.

NOM.

Jam on!

*If tomatoes aren’t particularly ripe, add a pinch of sugar; it helps to brighten the flavor.

Advertisements

4 responses to “Tomato Fondue.

  1. Step one is the most violent kitchen-based description I’ve ever read. Boil, shock, skin, squeeze? Jesus. Also, there’s no cheese in this. I feel totally misled.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s